Allium Cepa

Allium_cepa.jpg

NAME:  Allium cepa

FAMILY: Liliaceae

COMMON NAMES: Onion, bulb onion, common onion

LOCAL NAMES: Alubosa, Albasa, Yabase, Albasa gudaji

USEFUL PART(s):  Leaves, Bulb

GENERAL USES:

  • Onions serves as a food, cooked as vegetables or as ingredient for delicacies 

  • Onions are usually use in education to teach the use of a microscope for viewing  cell structure

 

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • China

  • Egypt

  • Nigeria

  • England

  • India

  • Senegal

  • Mali

  • Burkina Faso

  • Ghana 

  • Kenya

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Allium cepa medicinal values include:

  • Cough

  • Diuretic

  • Anthelmintics

  • Weak erection

  • Anti-tumour

  • boils

  • stings

  • Rubefacient

  • Throat infection

  • Headache

  • Asthma

FUNFUL FACT

  • Onions are biennial plants which has bluish-green leaves and its bulb at the base is encircle by fleshy modified leaves

  • They have a strong odour when cut and contain certain chemical substances which irritate the eyes.

  • Onions are toxic to some animals e.g. dog, cat, goat etc.

FURTHER READINGS

El-Aasr, M., Fujiwara, Y., Takeya, M., Ikeda, T., Tsukamoto, S., Ono, M., … Nohara, T. (2010). Onionin a from allium cepa inhibits macrophage activation. Journal of Natural Products, 73(7), 1306–1308. https://doi.org/10.1021/np100105u

Khanna, N., & Sharma, S. (2013). Allium Cepa Root Chromosomal Aberration Assay: A Review. Indian J. Pharm. Biol. Res, 1(3), 105–119. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2008.06.004

Muñoz, D. M., & Guerrero, N. (2013). Allium test para evaluar el efecto citotóxico y genotóxico de extractos naturales en células meristemáticas de Allium cepa. Memorias, 11(19), 83–86.

Ozakca, D. U., & Silah, H. (2013). Genotoxicity effects of Flusilazole on the somatic cells of Allium cepa. Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, 107(1), 38–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pestbp.2013.05.001

Özkara, A., Akyıl, D., Eren, Y., & Erdoğmuş, S. F. (2015). Potential cytotoxic effect of Anilofos by using Allium cepa assay. Cytotechnology, 67(5), 783–791. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10616-014-9716-1

Pobłocka-Olech, L., Głód, D., Zebrowska, M. E., Sznitowska, M., & Krauze-Baranowska, M. (2016). TLC determination of flavonoids from different cultivars of Allium cepa and Allium ascalonicum. Acta Pharmaceutica, 66(4), 543–554. https://doi.org/10.1515/acph-2016-0038

Qin, R., Ning, C., Björn, L. O., & Li, S. (2016). Proteomic analysis of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. roots under copper stress. Plant and Soil, 401(1–2), 197–212. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-015-2741-9

Sari, M. U., Hartono, R., & Hakim, L. (2013). Sifat Antirayap Ekstrak Kulit Bawang Merah (Allium cepa). Jurnal USU, 139–145.

Setyadjit, & Sukasih, E. (2015). Effect of Addition of Filler on the Production of Shallot (Allium Cepa Var. Ascalonicum L.) Powder with Drum Dryer. Procedia Food Science, 3, 396–408. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.profoo.2015.01.044

Surono, A. S. (2013). Antibakteri Ekstrak Etanol Umbi Lapis Bawang Merah (Allium cepa L.) Terhadap Pertumbuhan Staphylococcus aureus dan Escherichia coli. Jurnal Ilmiah Mahasiswa Universitas Surabaya, 2(1), 1–15.

Ye, C.-L., Dai, D.-H., & Hu, W.-L. (2013). Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil from onion (Allium cepa L.). Food Control, 30(1), 48–53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.07.033

Allium Ascalonicum

Allium Ascalonicum.jpg

NAME:  Allium ascalonicum

FAMILY: Liliaceae

COMMON NAMES: Shallot, Spring onion

LOCAL NAMES: Alubosa-elewe, Albasa maigo, kaanda, praan

USEFUL PART(s):  Leaves, Bulb

GENERAL USES:

  • Allium ascalonicum  is majorly use in cooking  in spicing foods and as an ingredient

 

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Nigeria

  • USA

  • China

  • India

  • Malaysia

  • Thailand

  • Ghana

  • Indonesia

  • Vietnam

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Allium ascalonicum medicinal values include:

  • Convulsion

  • Dysentery

  • Sore throat

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

FUNFUL FACT

  • Shallot has its name from Ashkelon, an old Philistine city

  • It’s  in clusters of short prostrate shoot and often use because of their pleasant taste and flavour but it has a strong smell

  • Shallot is a type of onion but the flavour is not sharp or strong compared to onions

FURTHER READINGS

Acheampong, A., Badu, M., & Agyemang, A. Y. (2016). Comparative Total Phenolics and Antioxidant Activities of Xanthosoma colocasia , Solanum torvum and Allium ascalonicum L . International Journal of Chemical and Biomolecular Science, 2(4), 73–79.

Jamilah, & Novita, E. (2016). Pengaruh Pupuk Organik Cair Crocober Terhadap Tanaman Bawang Merah (Allium ascalonicum L.). Jurnal Ipteks Terapan, 2(2), 67–73. https://doi.org/10.22216/jit.2014.v8i2.424

Mariana Putri, Rosita Sipayung, M. S. (2012). PERTUMBUHAN DAN PRODUKSI BAWANG MERAH (Allium ascalonicum L.) DENGAN PEMBERIAN VERMIKOMPOS DAN URINE DOMBA. Jurnal Online Agroekoteknologi, 1(1), 125 & 137.

Pandurangan, V., Amanulla, S. S. D., & Ramanathan, K. (2016). Anticancer efficacy of dry and fresh Allium ascalonicum (shallot) against HepG2 cell line. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6(3), 196–199. https://doi.org/10.5455/njppp.2016.6.08012016112

Pobłocka-Olech, L., Głód, D., Zebrowska, M. E., Sznitowska, M., & Krauze-Baranowska, M. (2016). TLC determination of flavonoids from different cultivars of Allium cepa and Allium ascalonicum. Acta Pharmaceutica, 66(4), 543–554. https://doi.org/10.1515/acph-2016-0038

Raeisi, S., Sharifi-Rad, M., Quek, S. Y., Shabanpour, B., & Sharifi-Rad, J. (2016). Evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of shallot (Allium ascalonicum L.) fruit and ajwain (Trachyspermum ammi (L.) Sprague) seed extracts in semi-fried coated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets for shelf-life extension. LWT - Food Science and Technology, 65, 112–121. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lwt.2015.07.064

Rosliani, R., Hidayat, I. M., Sulastrini, I., & Hilman, Y. (2016). Dissemination of technology for shallot (Allium ascalonicum L.) seed production using true shallot seed (TSS) in Indonesia. In Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 1143, pp. 345–352). https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1143.49

Setyadjit, & Sukasih, E. (2015). Effect of Addition of Filler on the Production of Shallot (Allium Cepa Var. Ascalonicum L.) Powder with Drum Dryer. Procedia Food Science, 3, 396–408. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.profoo.2015.01.044

Tubić, L., Anačkov, G., Milojević, J., Ghalawenji, N., Mitić, N., Igić, R., & Zdravković-Korać, S. (2014). High variability in the tissue culture response of root-tips of Allium ascalonicum individuals and optimization of the regeneration procedure. Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, 118(1), 101–110. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11240-014-0465-9

Zonyane, S., Van Vuuren, S. F., & Makunga, N. P. (2013). Antimicrobial interactions of Khoi-San poly-herbal remedies with emphasis on the combination; Agathosma crenulata, Dodonaea viscosa and Eucalyptus globulus. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 148(1), 144–151. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2013.04.003

Allanblackia Floribunda

1024_Allanblackia-floribunda-seedling-P1280086.jpg

NAME:  Allanblackia floribunda 

FAMILY: Guttiferae

COMMON NAMES: tallow tree, vegetable tallow

LOCAL NAMES: Orogbo erin, Egba, Nkpukpotiri, anane, bohwe

USEFUL PART(s):  Root, leaves, stem-bark, fruit

GENERAL USES:

  • The wood is use in light constructions, furniture e.g. door, window frames etc.

  • It can also be use as chew-sticks, candlesticks

  • The wood can be use as firewood

  • The seed produce fat which is used in preparing food

 

Geographic Distribution

  • Nigeria

  • Togo

  • Congo

  • Uganda

  • Cameroon

  • Ghana

  • Sierra Leone

  • Gabon

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Allanblackia floribunda medicinal values include:

  • Malaria

  • Dysentery

  • Toothache

  • Chicken pox

  • Small pox

  • Measles

  • Hypertension

  • Pain relief

  • Toothache

  • Asthma

FUNFUL FACT

  • The fruits from the tree are big and much

  • It is an evergreen plant and occur in rainforest areas

FURTHER READINGS

Akpanika, G. A., Winters, A., Wilson, T., Ayoola, G. A., Adepoju-Bello, A. A., & Hauck, B. (2017). Polyphenols from Allanblackia floribunda seeds: Identification, quantification and antioxidant activity. Food Chemistry, 222, 35–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.12.002

Azebaze, A. G. B., Teinkela, J. E. M., Nguemfo, E. L., Valentin, A., Dongmo, A. B., & Vardamides, J. C. (2015). Antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds from cameroonians allanblackia. African Health Sciences, 15(3), 835–840. https://doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v15i3.18

Boudjeko, T., Megnekou, R., Woguia, A. L., Kegne, F. M., Ngomoyogoli, J. E. K., Tchapoum, C. D. N., & Koum, O. (2015). Antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties of polysaccharides from Allanblackia floribunda Oliv stem bark and Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and H.E. Robins leaves. BMC Research Notes, 8(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-015-1703-x

Brusotti, G., Papetti, A., Serra, M., Temporini, C., Marini, E., Orlandini, S., … Kamtchouing, P. (2016). Allanblackia floribunda Oliv.: An aphrodisiac plant with vasorelaxant properties. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 192, 480–485. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2016.09.033

Fobane, J. L., Ndam, E. N., & Mbolo, M. (2014). Population structure and natural regeneration of Allanblackia floribunda Oliv. (Clusiaceae) in a forest concession of East Cameroon. Journal of Biodiversity and Environmental Sciences (JBES). Retrieved from http://www.innspub.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/JBES-Vol4No2-p403-410.pdf

Loumouamou, B. W., Binaki, A. F., & Silou, T. (2014). Oleaginous character and profiles in fatty acids and in triacylglyc??rols of the seeds of Allanblackia floribunda Oliv. of Congo. Advance Journal of Food Science and Technology, 6(3), 308–315.

Sanda, A. K., Miegueu, P., Bilanda, D. C., Ngassam, M. F. N., Watcho, P., Djomeni, P. D. D., & Kamtchouing, P. (2013). Ejaculatory activities of Allanblackia floribunda stem bark in spinal male rats. Pharmaceutical Biology, 51(8), 1014–1020. https://doi.org/10.3109/13880209.2013.774029

Tsobeng, A., Ofori, D., Tchoundjeu, Z., Asaah, E., & Van Damme, P. (2016). Improving growth of stockplants and rooting ability of leafy stem cuttings of Allanblackia floribunda Oliver (Clusiaceae) using different NPK fertilizers and periods of application. New Forests, 47(2), 179–194. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11056-015-9517-1

Allamanda cathartica

Allamanda-cathartica.jpg

NAME:  Allamanda cathartica

FAMILY: Apocynaceae

COMMON NAMES: Yellow allamanda, Angel's trumpet, Butter-cup, Golden trumpet, Guinea herb

LOCAL NAMES: Ododo-alamanda, canario, ruan huang chan

USEFUL PART(s):  Roots

GENERAL USES:

  • The shrub serves as  wind-breaker

  • It can also be use for demarcation and support

 

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Brazil

  • Sri Lanka

  • Australia

  • China

  • USA

  • Fiji

  • Honduras

  • Costa Rica

  • Nicaragua

  • Puerto Rico

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Allamanda cathartica medicinal values include:

  • Antimicrobials

  • Malaria

  • Dysentery

  • Cathartic.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Ornamental plant

  • Environmental weed in some areas

FACT

  • The parts of the plant are toxic to both farm animal and man and contains milky latex

  • It is a woody vine whose flower is yellow and has a trumpet shape

  • It is propagated by seed and stem cutting

FURTHER READINGS

Bonomini, T. J., Holzmann, I., Thiesen, L. C., Fratoni, E., Muller, A. F. F., Lucinda-Silva, R. M., … Santin, J. R. (2017). Neuropharmacological and acute toxicological evaluation of ethanolic extract of Allamanda cathartica L. flowers and plumieride. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 91, 9–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yrtph.2017.10.005

Chaveerach, A., Tanee, T., Patarapadungkit, N., Khamwachirapithak, P., & Sudmoon, R. (2016). Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Allamanda and Plumeria species. ScienceAsia, 42(6), 375–381. https://doi.org/10.2306/scienceasia1513-1874.2016.42.375

Conrad, O. A., Dike, I. P., & Agbara, U. (2013). In vivo antioxidant assessment of two antimalarial plants-Allamamda cathartica and Bixa orellana. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, 3(5), 388–394. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(13)60082-9

Karunakaran, G., Jagathambal, M., Gusev, A., Kolesnikov, E., Mandal, A. R., & Kuznetsov, D. (2016). Allamanda cathartica flower’s aqueous extract-mediated green synthesis of silver nanoparticles with excellent antioxidant and antibacterial potential for biomedical application. MRS Communications, 6(1), 41–46. https://doi.org/10.1557/mrc.2016.2

Okoduwa, S. I. R., Mbora, L. O., Adu, M. E., & Adeyi, A. A. (2015a). Comparative Analysis of the Properties of Acid-Base Indicator of Rose ( Rosa setigera ), Allamanda ( Allamanda cathartica ), and Hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ) Flowers. Biochemistry Research International, 2015, 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/381721

Okoduwa, S. I. R., Mbora, L. O., Adu, M. E., & Adeyi, A. A. (2015b). Comparative analysis of the properties of acid-base indicator of rose (Rosa setigera), Allamanda (Allamanda cathartica), and hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) flowers. Biochemistry Research International, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/381721

Rajamanickam, K., & Sudha, S. S. (2013). In-vitro antimicrobial activity and in-vivo toxicity of Moringa oleifera and Allamanda cathartica against multiple drug resistant clinical pathogens. International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences, 4(1).

Alchornea Laxiflora

Alchornea laxiflora.jpg

NAME:  Alchornea laxiflora

FAMILY: Euphorbiaceae

COMMON NAMES: Three-veined bead string, Lowveld bead-string

LOCAL NAMES: Pepe, Ijan, uwenuwen, ububo, longoso

USEFUL PART(s):  Stem, roots, leaves

GENERAL USES:

  •  Leaves are used as wrapping and keeping material from destroying

  • Tender branches are used as chewing sticks for cleaning the teeth

  • Stems can be used as fence poles and also in making household and domestic items

 

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Nigeria

  • Ethiopia

  • Congo

  • Zimbabwe

  • Mozambique

  • South Africa

  • Swaziland.

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Alchornea laxiflora medicinal values include:

  • Hernia

  • venereal diseases

  • Emmenagogue

  • Ring worm

  • Inflammatory diseases

  • Malaria

  • Pain relief

FUNFUL FACT

  • Alchornea laxiflora is a deciduous, upright small tree about 7–10 m tall and common in evergreen forests.

  • The flowers are unisexual and the fruits are even, dark green, brown, slightly hairy and has 3 seeds

FURTHER READINGS

Akinpelu, D. A., Abioye, E. O., Aiyegoro, O. A., Akinpelu, O. F., & Okoh, A. I. (2015). Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal properties of alchornea laxiflora (Benth.) Pax. & Hoffman. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/684839

Bafor, E. E., Eyohan, S. E., Omoruyi, O., Elvis-Offiah, U. B., Ayinde, B., Eze, G. I., … Braimoh, K. P. (2015). Preliminary endocrinological, histological and haematological investigation of Alchornea laxiflora (Euphorbiaceae) leaf extract effects on the ovary, uterus and cervix of mouse models. J Sci Pract Pharm December, 2(1), 55–63.

Kingsley, O., Esosa, U. S., Georgina, E. O., Sunday, J. J., & Spencer, N. C. O. (2013). Possible Reversal of Sodium Arsenate-induced Liver Toxicity by Hexane Leaf Extract of Alchornea laxiflora. Asian Journal of Medical Sciences, 5(1), 3–8.

Okokon, J. E., Augustine, N. B., & Mohanakrishnan, D. (2017). Antimalarial, antiplasmodial and analgesic activities of root extract of Alchornea laxiflora. Pharmaceutical Biology, 55(1), 1022–1031. https://doi.org/10.1080/13880209.2017.1285947

Olajire, A. A., Adeyeye, G. O., & Yusuf, R. A. (2017). Alchornea laxiflora Bark Extract Assisted Green Synthesis of Platinum Nanoparticles for Oxidative Desulphurization of Model Oil. Journal of Cluster Science, 28(3), 1565–1578. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10876-017-1167-3

Sandjo, L. P., Poumale, H. M. P., Noudou, X. S., Ntede, H. N., Shiono, Y., Ngadjui, B. T., … Mbafor, J. T. (2011). Erratum: Two new fatty acid derivatives from the stem bark of Alchornea laxiflora (Euphorbiaceae) (JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society DOI: 10.1007/s11746-011-1770-7). JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-011-1890-0

Tchinda, C. F., Voukeng, I. K., Beng, V. P., & Kuete, V. (2017). Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea laxiflora, Laportea ovalifolia and three other Cameroonian plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, 24(4), 950–955. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2016.01.033

Alchornea Cordifolia

Giloy.png

NAME:  Alchornea cordifolia

FAMILY: Euphorbiaceae

COMMON NAMES: Christmas bush

LOCAL NAMES: Ipa, esinsin, eepa, bambami, ububo, bulora, garagasaki

USEFUL PART(s):  Leaves, stem, bark, twig

GENERAL USES:

  • The part of the tree is use in making dyes, inks and stains

  • The wood is use in furniture and for house construction

  • The leaves can be cooked and serves as food

  • The wood serves as fuel

 

Geographic Distribution

  • Ghana

  • Togo

  • Nigeria

  • Cameroon

  •  sierra leone

  • Liberia

  • Mali

  • Ivory coast

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Alchornea cordifolia medicinal values include:

  • Fever

  • Rheumatism

  • antimicrobials

  • Diuretic

  • Purgative

  • Toothache

  • Cough

  • Sore

  • Gonorrhea

  • Insomnia

  • Diarrhea

  • Haemorrhoids

  • Antiaborifacients

  • Venereal diseases

  • Epilepsy

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Improve soil fertility

  • Shelter tree for crops

FUNFUL FACT

  • The mode of propagation is by seed or stem cuttings

  • It is a medicinal plant which scatter easily and usually found in secondary forest

FURTHER READINGS

Adeneye, A. A. dewale, Oreagba, A. I. brahim, Ishola, I. O. gunbayode, & Kalejaiye, H. A. deola. (2014). Evaluation of the anti-arthritic activity of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of Alchornea cordifolia in rats. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative Medicines : AJTCAM / African Networks on Ethnomedicines, 11(2), 402–410.

Adeshina, G. O., Kunle, O. F., Onaolapo, J. A., Ehinmidu, J. O., & Odama, L. E. (2012). Antimicrobial Activity of the Aqueous and Ethyl Acetate Sub-Fractions of Alchornea cordifolia Leaf. European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 2(1), 31–41.

Ajibade, T. O., & Olayemi, F. O. (2015). Reproductive and toxic effects of methanol extract of Alchornea cordifolia leaf in male rats. Andrologia, 47(9), 1034–1040. https://doi.org/10.1111/and.12374

Boniface, P. K., Ferreira, S. B., & Kaiser, C. R. (2016). Recent trends in phytochemistry, ethnobotany and pharmacological significance of Alchornea cordifolia (Schumach. & Thonn.) Muell. Arg. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2016.06.021

Djimeli, M. N., Fodouop, S. P. C., Njateng, G. S. S., Fokunang, C., Tala, D. S., Kengni, F., & Gatsing, D. (2017). Antibacterial activities and toxicological study of the aqueous extract from leaves of Alchornea cordifolia (Euphorbiaceae). BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12906-017-1854-5

Kouakou, K., Schepetkin, I. A., Yapi, A., Kirpotina, L. N., Jutila, M. A., & Quinn, M. T. (2013). Immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Alchornea cordifolia. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 146(1), 232–242. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2012.12.037

Mambe, F. T., Voukeng, I. K., Beng, V. P., & Kuete, V. (2016). Antibacterial activities of methanol extracts from Alchornea cordifolia and four other Cameroonian plants against MDR phenotypes. Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences, 11(2), 121–127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtumed.2015.12.001

Ngaha, N. M. I., Dahlan, I., Massoma, L. D., Mandengue, S. H., & Yusuf, A. A. (2016). Comparative Proximate Analysis of Leaves and Bark of Alchornea Cordifolia (Euphorbiaceae). Journal of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, 5(1), 84–90. https://doi.org/10.15640/jaes.v5n1a9

Okoye, F. B. C., Osadebe, P. O., Nworu, C. S., Okoye, N. N., Omeje, E. O., & Esimone, C. O. (2011). Topical anti-inflammatory constituents of lipophilic leaf fractions of Alchornea floribunda and Alchornea cordifolia. Natural Product Research, 25(20), 1941–1949. https://doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2010.512272

Osadebe, P. O., Okoye, F. B. C., Uzor, P. F., Nnamani, N. R., Adiele, I. E., & Obiano, N. C. (2012). Phytochemical analysis, hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of Alchornea cordifolia methanol leaf extract on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage in rats. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine, 5(4), 289–293. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1995-7645(12)60041-8

Albizia Zygia

Albizia_zygia_PBirnb_CAN02038_100351.JPG

NAME:  Albizia zygia

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: Okuro, Atanza, Siris

LOCAL NAMES: Ayinre-weere, kurmii

USEFUL PART(s):  Bark

GENERAL USES:

  • It is used for carving, flooring and furniture
  • It can be used as firewood and charcoal is produce
  • The pulp from the wood is use to produce paper
  • Tender  leaves are eaten which are cooked as a vegetable

 

Geographic Distribution

  •  Senegal
  •  Kenya
  • Angola
  • Tanzania
  • Ghana
  • Nigeria

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Albizia zygia medicinal values include:

  • Arthritis
  • Sprain
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Purgative
  • Toothache
  • Vermifuge
  •  Sores
  •  Bronchial diseases
  •  Fever

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Ornamental tree
  • Shade tree
  • Fix nitrogen in the soil

FUNFUL FACT

  •  Albizia zygia is a rapid-growing, medium-sized deciduous tree with a spreading crown
  •  It grows well in loamy or clayey soil

FURTHER READINGS

Abotsi, W. K. M., Lamptey, S. B., Afrane, S., Boakye-Gyasi, E., Umoh, R. U., & Woode, E. (2017). An evaluation of the anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic effects of hydroethanol leaf extract of albizia zygia in animal models. Pharmaceutical Biology, 55(1), 338–348. https://doi.org/10.1080/13880209.2016.1262434

Amoateng, P., Osei-Safo, D., Kukuia, K. K. E., Adjei, S., Akure, O. A., Agbemelo-Tsomafo, C., … Agyeman-Badu, K. Y. (2017). Psychotropic Effects of an Alcoholic Extract from the Leaves of Albizia zygia (Leguminosae-Mimosoideae). Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9297808

Eddy, N. O., Abechi, S. E., Ameh, P., & Ebenso, E. E. (2013). GCMS, FTIR, SEM, physiochemical and rheological studies on Albizia zygia gum. Walailak Journal of Science and Technology, 10(3), 247–265.

KOUASSI, K. H., N’GUESSAN, K., & and Kassi Justin N’DJA. (2013). Influence of the dynamics of Albizia adianthifolia and Albizia zygia on the dynamics of other woody forest. International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies, 3(1), 68–74. Retrieved from http://www.issr-journals.org/ijias/abstract.php?article=IJIAS-13-067-33

Lamptey, S. B., & Abotsi, W. K. M. (2017). Albizia zygia (DC.) Macbr. hydroethanol root extract exerts anti-oedemic and in vivo antioxidant activities in animal models. Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science, 7(4), 199–205. https://doi.org/10.7324/JAPS.2017.70429

Ndjakou Lenta, B., Vonthron-Sénécheau, C., Fongang Soh, R., Tantangmo, F., Ngouela, S., Kaiser, M., … Weniger, B. (2007). In vitro antiprotozoal activities and cytotoxicity of some selected Cameroonian medicinal plants. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 111(1), 8–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2006.10.036

Noté, O. P., Simo, L., Mbing, J. N., Guillaume, D., Aouazou, S. A., Muller, C. D., … Lobstein, A. (2016). Two new triterpenoid saponins from the roots of Albizia zygia (DC.) J.F. Macbr. Phytochemistry Letters. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phytol.2016.09.010

O, U. J., O, O. L., & Igbinaduwa P O. (2017). Albizia zygia (D.C.) Macbr (Fabaceae): A Comparative Investigation of Phytochemical Composition, Proximate Analysis and Anti-Seizure Properties of Methanol Extracts of Its Leaves and Stem-Bark. Nigerian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Applied Science Research, 6(2), 76–80.

Ushida, K., Fujita, S., & Ohashi, G. (2006). Nutritional significance of the selective ingestion of Albizia zygia gum exudate by wild chimpanzees in Bossou, Guinea. American Journal of Primatology, 68(2), 143–151. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20212

Albizia Lebbeck

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NAME:  Albizia lebbeck

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: Silk flower, Lebbeck, flea tree, frywood, koko, Woman's tongue tree, Siris

LOCAL NAMES: Igbagbo, Shak shak tree

USEFUL PART(s):  Root, stem bark, leaves

GENERAL USES:

  • The leaves serves as fodder for farm animal
  • The wood is use as timber for constructions
  • The wood also serves as firewood for fuel
  • The bark can be use for soap

Geographic Distribution

  • New Guinea
  • Northern Australia
  • Nigeria
  • Ghana
  • India

WHY IS IT GREEN?

 Albizia lebbeck medicinal values include:

  • Astringent
  • Mouthwash
  • River-blindness
  • Gonorrhoea
  • Cough
  •  Flu
  •  Lung problems
  •  Pectoral problems
  •  Inflammations

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Shade tree
  • Improves the soil
  • Controls erosion

FUNFUL FACT 

  • It has the name ‘Shak Shak Tree’ because of the sound the seeds make in the pod.
  • A conspicuous deciduous tree with a spreading crown with height  reaching 15 - 20 metres

FURTHER READINGS

Babu, N. P., Pandikumar, P., & Ignacimuthu, S. (2009). Anti-inflammatory activity of Albizia lebbeck Benth., an ethnomedicinal plant, in acute and chronic animal models of inflammation. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 125(2), 356–360. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2009.02.041

Bobby, M. N., Wesely, E. G., & Johnson, M. (2012). High performance thin layer chromatography profile studies on the alkaloids of Albizia lebbeck. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, 2(1 SUPPL.). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(12)60119-1

Egito, A. S., Girardet, J. M., Laguna, L. E., Poirson, C., Mollé, D., Miclo, L., … Gaillard, J. L. (2007). Milk-clotting activity of enzyme extracts from sunflower and albizia seeds and specific hydrolysis of bovine κ-casein. International Dairy Journal, 17(7), 816–825. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idairyj.2006.09.012

Perveen, S., & Anis, M. (2015). Physiological and biochemical parameters influencing ex vitro establishment of the in vitro regenerants of Albizia lebbeck (L.) Benth.: an important soil reclaiming plantation tree. Agroforestry Systems, 89(4), 721–733. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10457-015-9809-7

Perveen, S., Varshney, A., Anis, M., & Aref, I. M. (2011). Influence of cytokinins, basal media and pH on adventitious shoot regeneration from excised root cultures of Albizia lebbeck. Journal of Forestry Research, 22(1), 47–52. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11676-011-0124-5

Rajesh, B., Saumya, D., Dharmajit, P., & Pavani, M. (2014). Formulation design and optimization of herbal gel containing albizia lebbeck bark extract. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 6(5), 111–114.

Seyydnejad, S. M., Niknejad, M., Darabpoor, I., & Motamedi, H. (2010). Antibacterial activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Callistemon citrinus and Albizia lebbeck. American Journal of Applied Sciences, 7(1), 13–16. https://doi.org/10.3844/ajassp.2010.13.16

Subramonia Pillai, N., Kannan, P. S., Vettivel, S. C., & Suresh, S. (2017). Optimization of transesterification of biodiesel using green catalyst derived from Albizia Lebbeck Pods by mixture design. Renewable Energy, 104, 185–196. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2016.12.035

Venkatesh, P., Mukherjee, P. K., Kumar, N. S., Bandyopadhyay, A., Fukui, H., Mizuguchi, H., & Islam, N. (2010). Anti-allergic activity of standardized extract of Albizia lebbeck with reference to catechin as a phytomarker. Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology, 32(2), 272–276. https://doi.org/10.3109/08923970903305481

Zia-Ul-Haq, M., Ahmad, S., Qayum, M., & Ercişli, S. (2013). Compositional studies and antioxidant potential of Albizia lebbeck (L.) Benth. pods and seeds. Turkish Journal of Biology, 37(1), 25–32. https://doi.org/10.3906/biy-1204-38

Albizia Ferruginea

Albizia ferruginea.jpg

NAME:  Albizia  ferruginea

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: False thorn albizia

LOCAL NAMES: Ayinre ogo, Ngu, kurmii, Iatandza, Awiemfosamina

USEFUL PART(s):  Root, stem bark, leaves

GENERAL USES:

  • It is used for construction, furniture and other tools such as toys, crates etc.
  • The wood is used as firewood for charcoal production
  • The leaves can be use to wash clothes
  • The leaves of the plant are eaten by farm animal

Geographic Distribution

  • Ghana
  • Liberia
  • Gabon
  • Senegal
  • Uganda
  • Angola
  • Nigeria
  • Sierra Leone

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Albizia  ferruginea  medicinal values include:

  •  Dysentery
  •  Constipation
  •  Fish poison
  •  Bronchial infections
  •  Fever
  •  Sores
  •  Pimples
  •  Vermifuge
  •  Jaundice

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  •  Ornamental tree
  •  Shade tree
  •  Soil improver

FUNFUL FACT

  •   Large deciduous tree which height is up to 45–50m
  •  The Leaves alternate and has rusty hairy
  •  The flowers are bisexual and  regular

FURTHER READINGS

Abubakar, M., & Majinda, R. (2016). GC-MS Analysis and Preliminary Antimicrobial Activity of Albizia adianthifolia (Schumach) and Pterocarpus angolensis (DC). Medicines, 3(1), 3. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines3010003

Ameh, P. O. (2015). A Comparative Study of the Inhibitory Effect of Gum Exudates from Khaya senegalensis and Albizia ferruginea on the Corrosion of Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Medium. International Journal of Metals, 2015, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/824873

Girma, Y., & Wolka, K. (2012). Effects of Albizia gummifera, Millettia ferruginea and Cordia africana leaf litter on the germination of Coffea arabica L. seed. International Journal of Agricultural Research, 7(6), 315–323. https://doi.org/10.3923/ijar.2012.315.323

Govender, R., Phulukdaree, A., Gengan, R. M., Anand, K., & Chuturgoon, A. A. (2013). Silver nanoparticles of Albizia adianthifolia: The induction of apoptosis in human lung carcinoma cell line. Journal of Nanobiotechnology, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/1477-3155-11-5

Kamga, J., Sandjo, L. P., Böke-Sarikahya, N., Kirmizigül, S., Kuete, V., & Ngadjui, B. T. (2014). Albiziaflavane A: A new flavane from Albizia ferruginea (Mimosoideae). Natural Product Research, 28(19), 1574–1578. https://doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2014.927466

Kokila, K., Priyadharshini, S. D., & Sujatha, V. (2013). Phytopharmacological properties of Albizia species: A review. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Kumar, D., Kumar, S., Kohli, S., Arya, R., & Gupta, J. (2011). Antidiabetic activity of methanolic bark extract of Albizia odoratissima Benth. in alloxan induced diabetic albino mice. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine, 4(11), 900–903. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1995-7645(11)60215-0

Albizia Adianthifolia

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NAME:  Albizia adianthifolia

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: Flatcrown albizia, West African albizia, rough-bark flat-crown

LOCAL NAMES: Banabana Ayinreta, Igbabo, Afema, Avu, Tsintsiyar, Kurmii, mchani mbao, mchani mbawa

USEFUL PART(s):  Bark

GENERAL USES:

  •  The wood of this plant is used for building and carving some items e.g. images, spoons, tools handles, toys, furniture etc.
  •  The wood also serve as firewood
  •  The viscous substance from the bark of the plant is used in improving beauty
  •  In some areas, the leaves and seeds are eaten as vegetables and to make sauce

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Senegal
  •  Kenya
  • Angola
  •  South Africa
  • Swaziland
  • Madagascar
  • Nigeria

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Albizia adianthifolia medicinal values include:

  • Gonorrhoea
  • Night blindness
  • Piles
  • Purgative
  • Skin problems(Scabies)
  • Anthelmintics
  • Cough
  • Toothache
  • Fever
  • Irregular menstruation
  • Stomachache

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Soil improvement
  • Shade for some crops

FUNFUL FACT

  • Albizia adianthifolia is a deciduous, conspicuous tree with a stretching, flat crown of green leaves with flowers
  • It is an ornamental tree with many seeds and grows easily in sandy soil

 

FURTHER READINGS

Abubakar, M., & Majinda, R. (2016). GC-MS Analysis and Preliminary Antimicrobial Activity of Albizia adianthifolia (Schumach) and Pterocarpus angolensis (DC). Medicines, 3(1), 3. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines3010003

Beppe, G. J., Dongmo, A. B., Foyet, H. S., Dimo, T., Mihasan, M., & Hritcu, L. (2015). The aqueous extract of Albizia adianthifolia leaves attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced anxiety, depression and oxidative stress in rat amygdala. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12906-015-0912-0

Beppe, G. J., Dongmo, A. B., Foyet, H. S., Tsabang, N., Olteanu, Z., Cioanca, O., … Hritcu, L. (2014). Memory-enhancing activities of the aqueous extract of Albizia adianthifolia leaves in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesion rodent model of Parkinson’s disease. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-14-142

Gengan, R. M., Anand, K., Phulukdaree, A., & Chuturgoon, A. (2013). A549 lung cell line activity of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles using Albizia adianthifolia leaf. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 105, 87–91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2012.12.044

Govender, R., Phulukdaree, A., Gengan, R. M., Anand, K., & Chuturgoon, A. A. (2013). Silver nanoparticles of Albizia adianthifolia: the induction of apoptosis in human lung carcinoma cell line. J Nanobiotechnology (Vol. 11). https://doi.org/10.1186/1477-3155-11-5

Govender, R., Phulukdaree, A., Gengan, R. M., Anand, K., & Chuturgoon, A. A. (2013). Silver nanoparticles of Albizia adianthifolia: The induction of apoptosis in human lung carcinoma cell line. Journal of Nanobiotechnology, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/1477-3155-11-5

KOUASSI, K. H., N’GUESSAN, K., & and Kassi Justin N’DJA. (2013). Influence of the dynamics of Albizia adianthifolia and Albizia zygia on the dynamics of other woody forest. International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies, 3(1), 68–74. Retrieved from http://www.issr-journals.org/ijias/abstract.php?article=IJIAS-13-067-33

Sonibare, M. A., Ayoola, I. O., & Elufioye, T. O. (2017). Antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of leaf extract and fractions of Albizia adianthifolia (Schumach) W.F. Wright. Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, 28(2), 143–148. https://doi.org/10.1515/jbcpp-2015-0054

Tchinda, C. F., Voukeng, I. K., Beng, V. P., & Kuete, V. (2017). Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea laxiflora, Laportea ovalifolia and three other Cameroonian plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, 24(4), 950–955. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2016.01.033

Alafia Barteri

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NAME: Alafia barteri

FAMILY: Apocynaceae

COMMON NAMES: Alafia chewing stick, guinea-fowl's crest

LOCAL NAMES: Agbari etu, ota, momunimo, ndambi

USEFUL PART(s):  Roots, leaves

GENERAL USES:

  • The root of the plant can be use as chew-sticks
  • The fibre from the stems of the plant serves as tying material for roofs etc.

 

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Guinea Bissau
  • Cameroon
  • Congo
  • Sierra Leone
  • Gabon
  • Liberia
  • Nigeria
  • Togo
  • Benin

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Alafia barteri medicinal values include:

  • Sickle cell anaemia
  • Rheumatic pains
  • Tooth-ache
  • Eye infections
  • Fever
  • Malaria
  • Antifungal

FUNFUL FACT

  • Alafia barteri is an active, climbing shrub which is said to be toxic

FURTHER READINGS

Aiyelaagbe, O. O., Negi, A. S., Hamid, A. A., Luqman, S., Kumar, S. B., & Kaneez, F. (2015). Chemical Constituents from Alafia Barteri Oliv. Leaves with Cytotoxic Activity. Journal of the Chinese Chemical Society, 62(9), 751–755. https://doi.org/10.1002/jccs.201500213

Colegate, S. M., Gardner, D. R., Betz, J. M., Fischer, O. W., Liede-Schumann, S., & Boppré, M. (2016). Pro-toxic 1,2-Dehydropyrrolizidine Alkaloid Esters, Including Unprecedented 10-Membered Macrocyclic Diesters, in the Medicinally-used Alafia cf. caudata and Amphineurion marginatum (Apocynaceae: Apocynoideae: Nerieae and Apocyneae). Phytochemical Analysis, 257–276. https://doi.org/10.1002/pca.2624

Hamid, A. A., Aiyelaagbe, O. O., Kaneez, F., Luqman, S., & Negi, A. S. (2017). Correction to: Isolation, characterization and antiproliferative evaluation of constituents from stem extracts of Alafia barteri Oliv. Hook. F. Medicinal Chemistry Research, p. 1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00044-017-2116-2

Hamid, A. A., Aiyelaagbe, O. O., Negi, A. S., Luqman, S., & Kaneez, F. (2017). New Triterpenoids from the Leaves of Alafia barteri. Chemistry of Natural Compounds, 53(6), 1075–1079. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10600-017-2204-z

Ishola, I. O., Oreagba, I. A., OkekeOgochukwu, N., & Olayemi, S. O. (2015). Analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions of Alafia barteri: Involvement of monoaminergic, nitrergic and opioidergic pathway. Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine, 25(2).

Lasisi, A. A., Olayiwola, M. A., Balogun, S. A., Akinloye, O. A., & Ojo, D. A. (2016). Phytochemical composition, cytotoxicity and in vitro antiplasmodial activity of fractions from Alafia barteri olive (Hook F. Icon)-Apocynaceae. Journal of Saudi Chemical Society, 20(1), 2–6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jscs.2012.05.003

Sofidiya, M. O., Imeh, E., Ezeani, C., Aigbe, F. R., & Akindele, A. J. (2014). Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of Alafia barteri. Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy, 24(3), 348–354. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2014.07.013

Wieringa, J. J. (2011). Novitates Gabonenses 70. the advantages of a specimen database: Alafia velutina is a synonym of Farquharia elliptica (Apocynaceae). Blumea: Journal of Plant Taxonomy and Plant Geography, 56(3), 240. https://doi.org/10.3767/000651911X609237

Ageratum Conyzoides

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NAME: Ageratum conyzoides

FAMILY: Compositae

COMMON NAMES: Goat weed, Billygoat-weed, chick weed, whiteweed

LOCAL NAMES: Imi-esu, Ula ujula, Urata, Ahenhen, pig feces, macela francesa

USEFUL PART(s):  Whole plant, leaves, root

GENERAL USES:

  • The plant can be use as an insecticide and nematicide
  •  Ornamental purpose

Geographic Distribution

  •  Brazil
  •  USA
  •  Mexico
  •  South Africa
  •  Uganda
  •  Vietnam
  •  Nigeria
  •  Ghana

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Ageratum conyzoides medicinal values include:

  •  Wounds
  •  Ulcers
  •  craw-craw
  •  Digestive disturbance
  •  Diarrhoea
  •  Emetic
  •  Skin diseases
  •  Antipyretic
  •  Gonorrhoea
  •   Sleeping sickness
  •   Eye wash
  •   Antidysenteric

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  •   The plant is an environmental weed

FUNFUL FACT

  •  The plant has an offensive smell, compared to that of a male goat, hence the common name billy goat weed.
  • The plant is an erect, branching with shallow, fibrous roots and the stems become strong and woody as they grow.

FURTHER READINGS

Amadi, B. A., Duru, M. K. C., & Agomuo, E. N. (2012). Chemical profilesof leaf, stem, root and flower of Ageratum conyzoides. Asian Journal of Plant Science and Research, 2(4), 428–432.

Bosi, C. F., Rosa, D. W., Grougnet, R., Lemonakis, N., Halabalaki, M., Skaltsounis, A. L., & Biavatti, M. W. (2013). Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in medicinal tea of ageratum conyzoides. Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy, 23(3), 425–432. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0102-695X2013005000028

Leke, W. N., Brown, J. K., Ligthart, M. E., Sattar, N., Njualem, D. K., & Kvarnheden, A. (2012). Ageratum conyzoides: A host to a unique begomovirus disease complex in Cameroon. Virus Research, 163(1), 229–237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2011.09.039

Mesa-Vanegas, A. M., Zapata-Uribe, S., Arana, L. M., Zapata, I. C., Monsalve, Z., & Rojano, B. (2015). Actividad antioxidante de extractos de diferente polaridad de Ageratum conyzoides L. Boletin Latinoamericano Y Del Caribe de Plantas Medicinales Y Aromaticas, 14(1), 1–10.

Nasrin, F. (2013). Antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of Ageratum conyzoides stems. International Current Pharmaceutical Journal, 2(2), 33–37.

Okunade, A. L. (2002). Ageratum conyzoides L.(Asteraceae). Fitoterapia, 73, 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2009.10.017

Shekhar, T. C., & Anju, G. (2014). Antioxidant Activity by DPPH Radical Scavenging Method of Ageratum conyzoides Linn. Leaves. American Journal of Ethnomedicine, 1(4), 244–249. Retrieved from http://www.ajethno.com

Singh, S. B., Devi, W. R., Marina,  a, Devi, W. I., Swapana, N., & Singh, C. B. (2013). Ethnobotany , phytochemistry and pharmacology of Ageratum conyzoides Linn ( Asteraceae ). Journal of Medicinal Plants Research, 7(8), 371–385. https://doi.org/10.5897/JMPR12.897

Verma, P. K., Sultana, M., Raina, R., Prawez, S., Pandita, S., Jamwal, N., & Mir, A. H. (2013). Hepatoprotective effects of Ageratum conyzoides L. on biochemical indices induced by acetaminophen toxicity in Wistar rats. Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science, 3(4SUPPL.1). https://doi.org/10.7324/JAPS.2013.34.S4

Agelaea Obliqua

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NAME: Agelaea Obliqua 

FAMILY: Connaraceae

COMMON NAMES: Horse tamarind

LOCAL NAMES: Esura, Okun, niawri kluabu, Homabiri, Alanhita nta, Ehu, Egu

USEFUL PART(s): Leaves

GENERAL USES:

  •   The fruit serves as chew stick for rubbing the teeth
  •  Ornamental purpose

Geographic Distribution

  • Nigeria
  • Togo
  • Ghana
  • Ivory Coast
  • Cameroon
  • Guinea Bissau

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Agelaea obliqua medicinal values include:

  • Childbirth (Relaxation of Muscles)
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Convulsion

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • The plant beautifies the environment

FUNFUL FACT

  • It is a scrambling plant or climber of the forest and secondary jungle
  • The leaves are compounded of three acuminate leaflet

FURTHER READINGS

Barry, K. M., Janos, D. P., Nichols, S., & Bowman, D. M. J. S. (2015). Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons. Frontiers in Plant Science, 6. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2015.00097

Fu, L., Li, Z. H., Huang, G. S., Wu, X. X., Ni, W. L., & Qü, W. W. (2014). The current and future potential geographic range of West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae). Insect Science, 21(2), 234–244. https://doi.org/10.1111/1744-7917.12018

López-Guillén, G., Toledo, J., & Rojas, J. C. (2010). Response of Anastrepha Obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) to Fruit Odors and Protein-Based Lures in Field Trials. Florida Entomologist, 93(2), 317–318. https://doi.org/10.1653/024.093.0228

López-Guillén, G., Virgen, A., & Rojas, J. C. (2009). Color preference of Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera, Tephritidae). Revista Brasileira de Entomologia, 53(1), 157–159. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0085-56262009000100034

Montoya, P., Flores, S., & Toledo, J. (2008). Effect of Rainfall and Soil Moisture on Survival of Adults and Immature Stages of Anastrepha ludens and A . obliqua ( Diptera : Tephritidae ) under Semi-field Conditions. Florida Entomologist, 91(4), 643–650.

Pinto, A. F. M., Berger, M., Reck, J., Terra, R. M. S., & Guimarães, J. A. (2010). Lonomia obliqua venom: In vivo effects and molecular aspects associated with the hemorrhagic syndrome. Toxicon. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2010.01.013

Scally, M., Into, F., Thomas, D. B., Ruiz-Arce, R., Barr, N. B., & Schuenzel, E. L. (2016). Resolution of inter and intra-species relationships of the West Indian fruit fly Anastrepha obliqua. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 101, 286–293. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.04.020

Zhang, Z. qun, Sun, X. ling, Xin, Z. jun, Luo, Z. xiu, Gao, Y., Bian, L., & Chen, Z. mao. (2013). Identification and Field Evaluation of Non-Host Volatiles Disturbing Host Location by the Tea Geometrid, Ectropis obliqua. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 39(10), 1284–1296. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-013-0344-6

Afzelia africana

afzelia_africana_reference.jpg

NAME: Afzelia africana

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: Apa, pod mahogany, African oak, African mahogany, counter wood

LOCAL NAMES: Apa-Igbo, Apa, kawo, Akpalata, Bilinga, Afzelia, Kilar

USEFUL PART(s): Root, leaves, stem-bark, seeds

GENERAL USES:    

  • Young leaves are cooked and eaten as a vegetable
  •  Fruit is edible but has a poisonous seed·  
  •  Dried seedpods are used as musical instruments
  •  The wood is used for fuel and for making charcoal
  •  The wood is use for ship building, construction, cabinetwork etc.

 

Geographic Distribution

  • Nigeria
  • Senegal
  • Uganda
  • Togo
  •  Benin
  •  Mali
  •  Guinea Bisau
  •  Ivory Coast

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Afzelia africana medicinal values include:

  • Gonorrhoea
  • Stomach disorders
  • Hernia
  • Lumbago
  • Febrifuge
  • Antiemetic
  • Backache
  • Malaria
  • Rheumatism
  • Arthritis

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Afzelia Africana improves the soil
  • Fix  Nitrogen in the soil

 

FACT

  • The African mahogany is a large, deciduous tree and it is usually exported to Europe. The seeds are poisonous

 

FURTHER READINGS

Amusa, T. O. (2011). Effects of three pre-treatment techniques on dormancy and germination of seeds of Afzelia africana (Sm. Ex pers). Journal of Horticulture and Forestry, 3(4), 96–103. Retrieved from http://www.academicjournals.org/JHF/PDF/pdf2011/April/Amusa.pdf

Assogbadjo, A. E., Mensah, S., & Kakaï, R. G. (2017). The relative importance of climatic gradient versus human disturbance in determining population structure of Afzelia africana in the Republic of Benin§. Southern Forests, 79(2), 125–132. https://doi.org/10.2989/20702620.2016.1255406

Donkpegan, A. S. L., Doucet, J.-L., Dainou, K., & Hardy, O. J. (2015). Microsatellite development and flow cytometry in the African tree genus Afzelia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) reveal a polyploid complex. Applications in Plant Sciences, 3(1), 1400097. https://doi.org/10.3732/apps.1400097

Martins, E., Omoyeme, I., Christiana, I., Ofoefule, S., & Olobayo, K. (2009). Isolation, characterzation and compaction properties of Afzelia africana gum exudates in hydrochlorothiazide tablet formulations. . African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 3(5), 265–272. Retrieved from http://academicjournals.org/AJPP/PDF/ pdf2009/May/Martins et al.pdf

Mensah, S., Houéhanou, T. D., Assogbadjo, A. E., Anyomi, K. A., Ouedraogo, A., & Kakaï, R. G. (2016). Latitudinal variation in the woody species diversity of afzelia africana sm. Habitats in West Africa. Tropical Ecology, 57(4), 717–726.

Ogbu, I. M., & Ajiwe, V. I. E. (2016). FTIR studies of thermal stability of the oils and methyl esters from Afzelia africana and Hura crepitans seeds. Renewable Energy, 96, 203–208. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2016.04.055

Oyedemi, O. O., Adewusi, E. A., Aiyegoro, O. A., & Akinpelu, D. A. (2011). Antidiabetic and haematological effect of aqueous extract of stem bark of Afzelia africana (Smith) on streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, 1(5), 353–358. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(11)60079-8

Sotannde, O. A., Oluwadare, A. O., Ogedoh, O., & Adeogun, P. F. (2012). Evaluation of cement-bonded particle board produced from Afzelia africana wood residues. Journal of Engineering Science and Technology, 7(6), 732–743.

Afrormosia laxiflor

 Source: Pythonpathos

Source: Pythonpathos

NAME: Afrormosia laxiflor

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: Kulkuli, satin wood, false dalbergia, afrormosia

LOCAL NAMES: Shedun, makarfo, abua ocha, kukulabu

USEFUL PART(s): Root

GENERAL USES:

  • The wood is use in making household and personal items such as furniture, toys, pestle, handles etc
  • The wood serves as fuel and makes a good charcoal

Geographic Distribution

  • Senegal
  • Sudan
  • Togo
  • Ivory Coast
  • Nigeria
  • Ghana
  • Republic of Guinea

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Afrormosia laxiflor medicinal values include:

  • Intoxicant
  • Headache
  • Body pains
  • Headache
  • Ophthalmia
  • Anticonvulsant
  • Oedema
  • Oral treatments
  • Diarrhoea
  • Dysentery
  • Venereal disease
  • Paralysis
  • Epilepsy
  • Convulsion

FUNFUL FACT

  • It is a deciduous  tree found in savannah woodland common  in rocky places
  • It is propagated through seed

FURTHER READINGS

Abou, O., Karamoko, O., Adama, C., & Augustin, A. A. (2013). Phytochemical screening and evaluation of the antibacterial activity of bark extracts of Pericopsis (Afrormosia) laxiflora (Benth.) of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL. Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research, 5(1), 86–90.

Bourland, N., Cerisier, F., Daïnou, K., Smith, A. L., Hubau, W., Beeckman, H., … Doucet, J. L. (2015). How tightly linked are Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae) patches to anthropogenic disturbances in Southeastern Cameroon? Forests, 6(2), 293–310. https://doi.org/10.3390/f6020293

Deklerck, V., Finch, K., Gasson, P., Van den Bulcke, J., Van Acker, J., Beeckman, H., & Espinoza, E. (2017). Comparison of species classification models of mass spectrometry data: Kernel Discriminant Analysis vs Random Forest; A case study of Afrormosia (Pericopsis elata (Harms) Meeuwen). Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 31(19), 1582–1588. https://doi.org/10.1002/rcm.7939

Haruna, A. K. (2000). Depressant and anticonvulsant properties of the root decoction of Afrormosia laxiflora (Leguminosae). Phytotherapy Research, 14(1), 57–59. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-1573(200002)14:1<57::AID-PTR538>3.0.CO;2-V

Ngo Bum, E., Soudi, S., Ayissi, E. R., Dong, C., Lakoulo, N. H., Maidawa, F., … Kamanyi, A. (2011). Anxiolytic activity evaluation of four medicinal plants from Cameroon. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative Medicines : AJTCAM / African Networks on Ethnomedicines, 8(5 Suppl), 130–139. https://doi.org/10.4314/ajtcam.v8i5S.19

Nils, B., Lambert, K. Y., Philippe, L., Bonaventure, S., Julien, P., Kasso, D., … Jean-Louis, D. (2012). Ecology of Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae), an Endangered Timber Species in Southeastern Cameroon. Biotropica, 44(6), 840–847. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7429.2012.00874.x

Aframomum melegueta

 Cultivated plant  Photograph by:&nbsp; François Guibert

Cultivated plant
Photograph by: François Guibert

NAME: Aframomum melegueta

FAMILY: Zingiberaceae

COMMON NAMES: Alligator pepper, grains of paradise, Melegueta pepper, Guinea pepper, Ossame

LOCAL NAMES: Ata-ire, Atare, Itaye, Ose oji, Citta, Gyandamaryaji, Maniguette

USEFUL PART(s): Leaves, seeds

GENERAL USES:

  • Grains of paradise is a spice use to season food
  • It is use in flavouring drinks, wines and beers

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Nigeria
  • Liberia
  • Ethiopia
  • Ghana
  • Cameroon

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Aframomum melegueta medicinal values include:

  • Stimulant
  • Smallpox
  • Chicken pox
  • Anthelmintics
  • Wounds
  • Coughs and Cold
  • Anaemia
  • Rheumatism
  •  Measles
  • Malaria
  • Toothache
  • Relieve from nausea
  • Constipation
  • Reduce vomiting
  • Menstrual pain

FUNFUL FACT

  • Aframomum melegueta can boost the level of testosterone in male
  • It has the name “grain of paradise” because of its high values
  • It is a cash crop

FURTHER READINGS

Adefegha, S. A., Oboh, G., Okeke, B. M., & Oyeleye, S. I. (2017). Comparative Effects of Alkaloid Extracts from Aframomum melegueta (Alligator Pepper) and Aframomum danielli (Bastered Melegueta) on Enzymes Relevant to Erectile Dysfunction. Journal of Dietary Supplements, 14(5), 542–552. https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2016.1272661

Amponsah, J., Adamtey, N., Elegba, W., & Danso, K. E. (2013). In situ morphometric characterization of Aframomum melegueta accessions in Ghana. AoB PLANTS, 5. https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plt027

D.O., A., K.T., O., T.P., O., O.J., O., & I.A, A. (2014). Nutritional, Minerals and Phytochemicals composition of Garcinia cola [Bitter cola] and Aframomum melegueta [Alligator pepper]. Journal Of Environmental Science, Toxicology And Food Technology, 8(1), 8 6-91.

Gbolade, A. (2012). Ethnobotanical study of plants used in treating hypertension in Edo State of Nigeria. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 144(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2012.07.018

Ilic, N. M., Dey, M., Poulev, A. A., Logendra, S., Kuhn, P. E., & Raskin, I. (2014). Anti-inflammatory activity of grains of paradise (Aframomum Melegueta Schum) extract. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62(43), 10452–10457. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf5026086

Kamte, S. L. N., Ranjbarian, F., Campagnaro, G. D., Nya, P. C. B., Mbuntcha, H., Woguem, V., … Maggi, F. (2017). Trypanosoma brucei inhibition by essential oils from medicinal and aromatic plants traditionally used in Cameroon (Azadirachta Indica, Aframomum Melegueta, Aframomum Daniellii, Clausena Anisata, Dichrostachys cinerea and Echinops Giganteus). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(7). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070737

Mohammed, A., Gbonjubola, V. A., Koorbanally, N. A., & Islam, M. S. (2017). Inhibition of key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes by compounds isolated from Aframomum melegueta fruit. Pharmaceutical Biology, 55(1), 1010–1016. https://doi.org/10.1080/13880209.2017.1286358

Mohammed, A., Koorbanally, N. A., & Islam, M. S. (2015). Ethyl acetate fraction of Aframomum melegueta fruit ameliorates pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and major diabetes-related parameters in a type 2 diabetes model of rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 175, 518–527. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2015.10.011

Mohammed, A., Koorbanally, N. A., & Islam, M. S. (2016). Phytochemistry, antioxidative activity and inhibition of key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes by various parts of Aframomum melegueta in vitro. Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica - Drug Research, 73(2), 403–417.

Umukoro, S., & Ashorobi, R. B. (2007). Further studies on the antinociceptive action of aqueous seed extract of Aframomum melegueta. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 109(3), 501–504. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2006.08.025

Afraegle paniculata

 Fruits - one cut open to show the seeds and flesh  Photograph by:&nbsp; Marco Schmidt

Fruits - one cut open to show the seeds and flesh
Photograph by: Marco Schmidt

NAME: Afraegle paniculata
FAMILY: Rutaceae
COMMON NAMES: Kokodi, Nigerian powder-flask fruit
LOCAL NAMES: Sanga, kalêdé, bukobabu
USEFUL PART(s): Leaves, bark, roots
 

GENERAL USES:

  • The seed produce oil  that can be eaten
  • The leaves when cooked also serve as food
  • The wood of the plant is use to make household and domestic tools or items

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Senegal
  • Nigeria

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Afraegle paniculata medicinal values include:

  • Gastro-intestinal disorders
  • Antispasmodic
  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Venereal diseases

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • The plant can serves as an ornament

FUNFUL FACT

  • Afraegle paniculata  is used as a rootstock for accession of bael fruit
  • The leaves are sometimes soften and added to the water used for bathing
  • Flowering period is from June to July and fruiting is from August to December.

FURTHER READINGS

Anju, D., Jugnu, G., Kavita, S., Arun, N., & Sandeep, D. (2012). a Review on Medicinal Prospectives of Andrographis Paniculata Nees. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Scientific Innovation, 1(1), 1–4.
Aziz, S. S. S. A., Sukari, M. A., Rahmani, M., Kitajima, M., Aimi, N., & Ahpandi, N. J. (2010). Koumarin daripada Murraya Paniculata (Rutaceae). Malaysian Journal of Analytical Sciences, 14(1), 1–5.
Costa, C. A. R. A., Tanimoto, A., Quaglio, A. E. V., Almeida, L. D., Severi, J. A., & Di Stasi, L. C. (2015). Anti-inflammatory effects of Brazilian ginseng (Pfaffia paniculata) on TNBS-induced intestinal inflammation: Experimental evidence. International Immunopharmacology, 28(1), 459–469. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2015.07.002
Gandi, S., Rao, K., Chodisetti, B., & Giri, A. (2012). Elicitation of Andrographolide in the Suspension Cultures of Andrographis paniculata. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 168(7), 1729–1738. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12010-012-9892-4
Okhuarobo, A., Ehizogie Falodun, J., Erharuyi, O., Imieje, V., Falodun, A., & Langer, P. (2014). Harnessing the medicinal properties of Andrographis paniculata for diseases and beyond: A review of its phytochemistry and pharmacology. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease, 4(3), 213–222. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2222-1808(14)60509-0
Pant, N., Misra, H., & Jain, D. C. (2014). A xanthone glycoside from aerial parts of Swertia paniculata. Journal of Saudi Chemical Society, 18(5), 551–554. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jscs.2011.11.001
Premanath, R., & Nanjaiah, L. (2015). Antidiabetic and Antioxidant potential of Andrographis paniculata Nees. leaf ethanol extract in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science, 5(1), 069–076. https://doi.org/10.7324/JAPS.2015.50113
Sandborn, W. J., Targan, S. R., Byers, V. S., Rutty, D. A., Mu, H., Zhang, X., & Tang, T. (2013). Andrographis paniculata extract (HMPL-004) for active ulcerative colitis. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 108(1), 90–98. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2012.340
Shi, J., Li, C. J., Yang, J. Z., Ma, J., Wang, C., Tang, J., … Zhang, D. M. (2014). Hepatoprotective coumarins and secoiridoids from Hydrangea paniculata. Fitoterapia, 96, 138–145. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2014.04.015

 

Afzelia africana

 Source:  Youtube

Source: Youtube

NAME: Afzelia africana

FAMILY: Leguminosae

COMMON NAMES: Apa, pod mahogany, African oak, African mahogany, counter wood

LOCAL NAMES: Apa-Igbo, Apa, kawo, Akpalata, Bilinga, Afzelia, Kilar

USEFUL PART(s): Root, leaves, stem-bark, seeds

GENERAL USES:

  • Young leaves are cooked and eaten as a vegetable
  • Fruit is edible but has a poisonous seed
  •  Dried seedpods are used as musical instruments
  • The wood is used for fuel and for making charcoal
  • The wood is use for ship building, construction, cabinetwork etc.

 GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Nigeria
  • Senegal
  • Uganda
  • Togo
  • Benin
  • Mali
  • Guinea Bissau
  • Ivory Coast

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Afzelia africana medicinal values include:

  • Gonorrhoea
  • Stomach disorders
  • Hernia
  • Lumbago
  • Febrifuge
  • Antiemetic
  • Backache
  • Malaria
  • Rheumatism
  • Arthritis

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  • Afzelia Africana improves the soil
  • Fix  Nitrogen in the soil

 FUNFUL FACT

  • The African mahogany is a large, deciduous tree and it is usually exported to Europe
  • The seeds are poisonous
Kigelia_africana_Wernfried.jpg

 FURTHER READINGS

Amusa, T. O. (2011). Effects of three pre-treatment techniques on dormancy and germination of seeds of Afzelia africana (Sm. Ex pers). Journal of Horticulture and Forestry, 3(4), 96–103. Retrieved from http://www.academicjournals.org/JHF/PDF/pdf2011/April/Amusa.pdf

Assogbadjo, A. E., Mensah, S., & Kakaï, R. G. (2017). The relative importance of climatic gradient versus human disturbance in determining population structure of Afzelia africana in the Republic of Benin§. Southern Forests, 79(2), 125–132. https://doi.org/10.2989/20702620.2016.1255406

Donkpegan, A. S. L., Doucet, J.-L., Dainou, K., & Hardy, O. J. (2015). Microsatellite development and flow cytometry in the African tree genus Afzelia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) reveal a polyploid complex. Applications in Plant Sciences, 3(1), 1400097. https://doi.org/10.3732/apps.1400097

Martins, E., Omoyeme, I., Christiana, I., Ofoefule, S., & Olobayo, K. (2009). Isolation, characterzation and compaction properties of Afzelia africana gum exudates in hydrochlorothiazide tablet formulations. . African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 3(5), 265–272. Retrieved from http://academicjournals.org/AJPP/PDF/ pdf2009/May/Martins et al.pdf

Mensah, S., Houéhanou, T. D., Assogbadjo, A. E., Anyomi, K. A., Ouedraogo, A., & Kakaï, R. G. (2016). Latitudinal variation in the woody species diversity of afzelia africana sm. Habitats in West Africa. Tropical Ecology, 57(4), 717–726.

Ogbu, I. M., & Ajiwe, V. I. E. (2016). FTIR studies of thermal stability of the oils and methyl esters from Afzelia africana and Hura crepitans seeds. Renewable Energy, 96, 203–208. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2016.04.055

Oyedemi, O. O., Adewusi, E. A., Aiyegoro, O. A., & Akinpelu, D. A. (2011). Antidiabetic and haematological effect of aqueous extract of stem bark of Afzelia africana (Smith) on streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, 1(5), 353–358. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(11)60079-8

Sotannde, O. A., Oluwadare, A. O., Ogedoh, O., & Adeogun, P. F. (2012). Evaluation of cement-bonded particle board produced from Afzelia africana wood residues. Journal of Engineering Science and Technology, 7(6), 732–743.

Aerva lanata

NAME: Aerva lanata

FAMILY: Amaranthaceae

COMMON NAME(s): Bhadram, Cherula, Mountain knotgrass

LOCAL NAMES: Eweowo, Aje, Efun-ile, Alhaji, Furfurata, Fatumi, Kapuri jadi

USEFUL PART(s): Whole plant

GENERAL USE(s):  

  • The whole plant is edible and serve as food for people
  • It is also edible for farm animals

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • India
  • Nigeria
  • Ghana
  • Uganda
  • Ethiopia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Australia

WHY IS IT GREEN?

Aerva lanata medicinal uses include:

  • Ulcers
  • Wounds
  • Snake bite
  • Diuretic
  • Purgative
  • Arthritis
  • Anthelmintic
  • Sore throat
  • Kidney and bladder stones
 Source:  commons.wikimedia.org  By Vinayaraj

Source: commons.wikimedia.org By Vinayaraj

FURTHER READINGS

Dinnimath, B. M., Jalalpure, S. S., & Patil, U. K. (2017). Antiurolithiatic activity of natural constituents isolated from Aerva lanata. Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, 8(4), 226–232. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaim.2016.11.006

Gujjeti, R. P., & Mamidala, E. (2017). Anti-HIV Activity of Phytosterol Isolated from Aerva lanata Roots. Pharmacognosy Journal, 9, 112–116. https://doi.org/10.5530/pj.2017.1.19

Ikewuchi, J. C., Uwakwe, A. A., Onyeike, E. N., & Ikewuchi, C. C. (2011). Hepatoprotective effect of an aqueous extract of the leaves of Acalypha wilkesiana “Godseffiana” Muell Arg (Euphorbiaceae) against carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury in rats. EXCLI Journal, 10, 280–289.

Kalirajan, A., Narayanan, K. R., Ranjitsingh, A. J. A., Ramalakshmi, C., & Parvathiraj, P. (2013). Bioprospecting medicinal plant Aerva lanata Juss. ex Schult. flowers for potential antimicrobial activity against clinical and fish-borne pathogens. Indian Journal of Natural Products and Resources, 4(3), 306–311.

Omotoso, K. S., Aigbe, F. R., Salako, O. A., Chijioke, M. C., & Adeyemi, O. O. (2017). Toxicological evaluation of the aqueous whole plant extract of Aerva lanata (l.) Juss. ex Schult (Amaranthaceae). Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 208, 174–184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2017.06.032

Poonkuzhali, K., Rajeswari, V., Saravanakumar, T., Viswanathamurthi, P., Park, S. M., Govarthanan, M., … Palvannan, T. (2014). Reduction of hexavalent chromium using Aerva lanata L.: Elucidation of reduction mechanism and identification of active principles. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 272, 89–95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.03.001

Raihan, O., Brishti, A., Bahar, E., Islam, F., Rahman, M., Tareq, S. M., & Hossain, M. A. (2012). Antioxidant and anticancer effect of methanolic extract of Aerva lanata Linn. against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) in vivo. Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine, 12(3), 219–225. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13596-012-0073-3

Rao, M. A., Palaksha, M. N., Sirisha, K. N., Bhargavi, V. L., & Manikandhar, P. (2014). Effect of Aerva lanata on cisplatin induced neurotoxicity in rats. World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3(2), 2431–2451. Retrieved from http://www.wjpps.com/current_issue.php%5Cnhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=cagh&AN=20143096275%5Cnhttp://oxfordsfx.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/oxford?sid=OVID:caghdb&id=pmid:&id=doi:&issn=2278-4357&isbn=&volume=3&issue=2&spage=2

Shekhawat, M. S., Manokari, M., & Revathi, J. (2017). In vitro propagation and ex vitro rooting of Aerva lanata (L.) Juss. ex Schult.: a rare medicinal plant. Indian Journal of Plant Physiology, 22(1), 40–47. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40502-016-0248-x

Thanganadar Appapalam, S., & Panchamoorthy, R. (2017). Aerva lanata mediated phytofabrication of silver nanoparticles and evaluation of their antibacterial activity against wound associated bacteria. Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers, 78, 539–551. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtice.2017.06.035

Vivek, D., Nair, N. G., Anju, M. P., Vatakkeel, B., Siju, E. N., & Aiswarya Lakshmi, A. G. (2015). In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Aerva lanata. International Journal of Toxicological and Pharmacological Research, 7(1), 57–59.

 

Adenium Obesum

 Source: Wikimedia

Source: Wikimedia

NAME: Adenium Obesum

FAMILY: Apoynaceae

COMMON NAME(s): Sabi star, Impala lily, Desert rose, Mock Azalea

LOCAL NAMES: Gariya

USEFUL PART(s):  Stem, roots, fruit, juice

GENERAL USE(s):  

  • The sap from the plant stem and root is used as arrow poison for hunting  and fish toxin
  • Ornamental purpose

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

  • Senegal
  • Sudan
  • Mauritania
  • Ethiopia,
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Yemen
  • Sri Lanka
  • Thailand

 WHY IS IT GREEN? 

 Adenium Obesum medicinal uses include:

  • Wound dressing
  • Ulcer
  • Cardiac tonic
  • Venereal diseases

OTHER IMPACT

The plant is toxic

FURTHER READINGS

Abalaka, S. E., Fatihu, M. Y., Ibrahim, N. D. G., & Ambali, S. F. (2015). Gills and skin histopathological evaluation in African sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus exposed to ethanol extract of Adenium obesum stem bark. Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research, 41(1), 119–127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejar.2015.01.005

Abalaka, S. E., Fatihu, M. Y., Ibrahim, N. D. G., & Ambali, S. F. (2015). Liver histopathological changes in Clarias gariepinus exposed to ethanol extract of Adenium obesum stem bark. Journal of Morphological Sciences, 32(1), 22–28. https://doi.org/10.4322/jms.069314

AL-Ghudani, M. K. N., & Hossain, M. A. (2015). Determination of total phenolics, flavonoids and antioxidant activity of root crude extracts of Adenium obesum traditionally used for the treatment of bone dislocations and rheumatism. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease, 5(S1), S155–S158. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2222-1808(15)60879-9

Farah, M. A., Ali, M. A., Chen, S.-M., Li, Y., Al-Hemaid, F. M., Abou-Tarboush, F. M., … Lee, J. (2016). Silver nanoparticles synthesized from Adenium obesum leaf extract induced DNA damage, apoptosis and autophagy via generation of reactive oxygen species. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.01.027

Farah, M. A., Ali, M. A., Chen, S.-M., Li, Y., Al-Hemaid, F. M., Abou-Tarboush, F. M., … Lee, J. (2016). Silver nanoparticles synthesized from Adenium obesum leaf extract induced DNA damage, apoptosis and autophagy via generation of reactive oxygen species. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 141, 158–169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.01.027

Farah, M. A., Ali, M. A., Chen, S. M., Li, Y., Al-Hemaid, F. M., Abou-Tarboush, F. M., … Lee, J. (2016). Silver nanoparticles synthesized from Adenium obesum leaf extract induced DNA damage, apoptosis and autophagy via generation of reactive oxygen species. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 141, 158–169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.01.027

Hossain, M. A., Sohail Akhtar, M., Said, S., & Al-Abri, T. H. A. (2017). Two new flavonoids from Adenium obesum grown in Oman. Journal of King Saud University - Science, 29(1), 62–69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jksus.2016.04.004

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